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Passing the Torch: CNS Presidents Ken Mack and Jon Mink

About the Speakers

Kenneth J. Mack, MD, PhD

Kenneth J. Mack, MD, PhD

Dr Kenneth Mack is Professor of Neurology and Pediatrics at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota.   His clinical interests involve working with patients who have chronic headaches, as well as patients with movement disorders.  His publications deal with the characteristics and treatment of children with chronic headaches, with particular interests in the research question of what is associated with the transformation of episodic headaches into chronic headaches.

Dr Mack obtained his MD and PhD degrees from the University of Illinois, Urbana.  From there, he trained in Pediatrics and Child Neurology at Washington University in St Louis. He received the CNS Young Investigator Award in 1991 (the award was renamed in honor of Dr. Philip R. Dodge in 2004).

Dr. Mack has been involved in leadership positions in the International Child Neurology Association, the American Headache Society, and the Child Neurology Society. He was elected CNS President by his peers in 2015, completing his two-year term in October, 2017; he currently serves on the CNS Board as Past-President. 


Jonathan W. Mink, MD, PhD

Jonathan W. Mink, MD, PhD

Jonathan W. Mink, MD, PhD is currently the Frederick A. Horner Endowed Professor in Pediatric Neurology at the University of Rochester (UR). He has served as the Chief of Child Neurology since 2001 and Vice Chair of Neurology at the UR since 2012. Dr. Mink received a BA (Biology-Psychology) and MA (Psychology) from Wesleyan University and his MD and PhD (Neuroscience) from Washington University in St. Louis.

After completing residency training in Pediatrics and Pediatric Neurology at Washington University/St. Louis Children’s Hospital, Dr. Mink then spent two years as a Movement Disorders fellow with Joel Perlmutter, also at Washington University. At the time, he was told that there was no such thing as a “Pediatric Movement Disorders Neurologist.”  He  joined the faculty at Washington University in 1996, established a research program and started a Pediatric Movement Disorders Clinic.

Dr. Mink moved to the University of Rochester in 2001. There were four child neurologists on the faculty at that time, and no child neurology residents. Dr. Mink established the Child Neurology Residency in 2003 and was the Program Director until 2014. The residency is thriving and has recruited 12 additional faculty members to join the Division. Dr. Mink’s  research programs have been focused on mechanisms of basal ganglia function, movement disorders in children. and Batten Disease. He directs the UR Tourette Syndrome and Batten Disease Centers of Excellence.

Dr. Mink has manifested a strong interest in education throughout his career. He is currently course director of the Neurology and Psychiatry Basic Science Block for 3rd year medical students. In addition to child neurology residents, he has been a direct mentor to 13 undergraduate students, 5 PhD students, 6 MD students, 4 fellows, and 6 K-award recipients. He was the PI of the UR NSADA from 2009 – 2015.

Dr. Mink has been actively involved in the CNS since 1994, serving as Councillor for the Northeast (2007-2009), Chair of the Research Committee (2005-2010), and Chair of the Scientific Selection and Program Planning Committee (2013-2015). In 2016, Dr. Mink was chosen to serve as President-Elect of the CNS by his peers in 2016; he currently serves on the CNS Board as President. Leadership positions in other organizations include: Executive Board of the American Neurological Association (ANA), Executive Board of the International Child Neurology Association (ICNA), Executive Committee of the AAP Section on Neurology, Executive Committee of the ACGME Neurology Review Committee, NINDS Advisory Council, and co-chair of the Tourette Association Scientific Advisory Board.

Dr. Mink is currently Associate Editor of Neurology and Associate Editor of Child Neurology for Continuum – Lifelong Learning in Neurology.